CRIMINI PREDICIBILI? L’ECLISSI DEL DIRITTO PENALE MODERNO IN “MINORITY REPORT” DI STEVEN SPIELBERG
di Daniele Velo Dalbrenta
(Università degli Studi di Verona)


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Abstract

Remotely inspired by Philip K. Dick’s short story of the same name, Steven Spielberg’s Minority Report seems to be a film that, despite a certain weakness under some logic and narrative aspects, successfully attempts to unveil a dystopia in reality – and vice versa. Taking advantage of an adequate screenplay and futuristic consultations (!), the director uses the literary starting point to state again, in the current time, the set of problems about the (not) predictability of criminal conduct, letting us distinguish experience concreteness beyond the dusk of modern theoretical dichotomy determinism/free will. What glimpsed in Dick’s brief story, except for the almost dreamlike dark ending, in the tempered Spielberg’s remake appears to exceed dystopic fiction and facing – against the light – the hidden dangers of the new police methodology of the XXI century: predictive policing. A methodology clearly indebted to the divisive penal positivism, but renovated in its premises, and promises, by info-technological advances that characterize contemporary society.